FGI Guidelines

This page provides a brief overview of the “FGI Guidelines,” which are either the Guidelines for Design and Construction of Healthcare Facilities (2010) or the Guidelines for Design and Construction of Hospitals and Outpatient Facilities (2014).

The FGI Guidelines recommend minimum program, space, functional program, patient handling, infection prevention, architectural detail, and surface and furnishing needs for clinical and support areas of hospitals, ambulatory care facilities, rehabilitation facilities, and nursing and other residential care facilities. The document also addresses minimum engineering design criteria for plumbing, electrical, and heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The Joint Commission, many federal agencies, and authorities in 42 states use the Guidelines either as a code or a reference standard when reviewing, approving, and financing plans; surveying, licensing, certifying, or accrediting newly constructed facilities; or developing their own codes.

The FGI Guidelines recommend minimum program, space, and equipment needs for clinical and support areas of hospitals, ambulatory care facilities, rehabilitation facilities, and nursing and other residential care facilities. The document also addresses minimum engineering design criteria for plumbing, electrical, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems.

To learn more about the FGI, please take a look at their About page.

Reference:  FGI Institute website

Surface material selection

In the 2010 edition of the guidelines, the appendix provides the following information for the selection of healthcare surface materials:

A1.2-3.2.1.5 Surface selection characteristics and criteria

Testing standards can verify whether a product provides specific characteristics. When selecting surfaces and furnishings, verification of third-party independent testing is expected to ensure that surfaces meet necessary code requirements. It is understood that in certain areas of the health care facility it will not be possible to use product with all of these characteristics; however, the goal is to strive to choose products with as many of these characteristics as possible.

Preferred surface characteristics (of the ideal product) include the following:

  • Easy to maintain, repair and clean
  • Does not support microbial growth
  • Non porous and smooth
  • Has acoustic properties (e.g. sound absorption), where applicable
  • Inflammable-Class 1 fire rating, low smoke toxicity
  • Durable
  • Sustainable
  • Low-VOC (no off-gassing)
  • Cost-effective (initial and life-cycle cost-effectiveness)
  • Slip-resistant (appropriate coefficient of friction)
  • Easy to install, demolish, and replace
  • Has compatible substrate and materials for surface assemblies
  • Seamless
  • Resilient, impact-resistant
  • Control reflectivity/glare
  • Has options for color, pattern, and texture
  • Made of non-toxic/non-allergenic materials

Reference: Guidelines for Design and Construction of Healthcare Facilities, The Facility Guidelines Institute 2010 Edition

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